Media

Blog

Blog

Making Social Work Work: Presentations on Current Research in the Field of Social Work

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 

The Canadian Association for Social Work Education (CASWE) hosted “Life Satisfaction for Disabled Youth: What Role Does Resilience Play?,” which comprised of three pre-recorded videos, each followed by a brief Q&A session, that summarized the results of some recent research that was conducted in the field of social work. 

University of Toronto Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work doctoral candidates Ran Hu and Ami Goulden presented their research on resilience, stating that “young people living with disabilities in Canada report significantly lower levels of perceived life satisfaction than their non-disabled peers.” They name ‘resilience,’ defined as “our capacity to navigate and negotiate resources that sustain our wellbeing,” as playing a significant role in narrowing the gap in life satisfaction between disabled and non-disabled young people. While meanings of...

Read more »

Let’s Talk about Inclusivity!

Congress 2021 edition 

By Anurika Onyenso, Third Year General Management Major, University of Alberta, Augustana Campus. 

Social inclusion is context-dependent and calls forth a myriad of philosophical ideals. The University of Alberta’s Faculty of Nursing’s “Social Inclusion and Health Equity” webcast invited a panel of eloquent speakers and participants to discuss their views on the topic of social inclusion and its links to human rights discourses and health outcomes. Their discussions were centered around marginalization, disadvantage and exclusion.  

The webcast began with a discussion paper presentation by Edythe Andison, registered nurse with a background in geriatrics, Sherry Dahlke, Associate Professor, Faculty of Nursing, and Robin Coatsworth-Puspoky, a Nursing PhD candidate at the University of Alberta with a background in geriatric mental health. They looked at how, as nurses, they can transcend geographical age boundaries, race,...

Read more »

Becoming Your Own Best Critic: How to Edit Your Own Work


Congress 2021 blog edition 
 
By Valerie Leow, J.D. Candidate, University of Alberta 
 
Many of you are likely familiar with the difficulties of editing your own writing. When reading over your own work, your brain has a tendency to make sense of what you think is on the page, rather than what is actually there, thus letting mistakes and inefficient writing pass by unnoticed. It is hard to edit your own writing. And it does not help that some of the most valuable – and obvious – strategies for editing your own writing are also, unfortunately, difficult to put into practice. Strategies like waiting a few weeks between drafting and editing, filling the time in between with a lot of other reading and writing, are simply not possible if you have a hard deadline to submit your work by. Alternatively, having a trusted friend or colleague look over your writing, or even hiring a professional editor, might also be impractical...

Read more »

How Social Meaning Constructs a Narrative of Adolescent Suicide Clusters

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram, PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

Trigger warning: This blog post discusses suicide in youth. 

How do we create the social meanings surrounding youth and suicide? This is a question Seth Abrutyn, Associate Professor at The University of British Columbia, is seeking to explore. Abrutyn begins his talk by calling into question the current methodological and theoretical directions of his home discipline, sociology, in terms of studying modern suicide. Suicide, particularly in young people, has never been more salient in our discourse and critical consciousness. Young people are evidently suffering, and one of the phenomena coming out of this tragedy is suicide clusters. 

Abrutyn argues that the issue of suicide clusters, particularly in high schools, is escalating, however we know very little about how they function and...

Read more »

Reimagining the World through Disability Arts and Justice 

Congress 2021 blog edition 

By Megan Perram, PhD Candidate in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Alberta 

In the fourth panel of the Big Thinking series at Congress, audience members were treated to an invigorating lecture-performance by Alice Sheppard, the Artistic Director of Kinetic Light. Kinetic Light is a project-based ensemble working at the intersections of disability, dance, design, identity, and technology to create transformative art and advance the intersectional disability arts movement. 

The most striking element of “Disability Will (re)...

Read more »

Pages